Rumor about Covid 19

A White House adviser said Sunday that the Trump administration is preparing for a possible second wave in the coronavirus pandemic this fall, as 29 states and U.S. territories logged an increase in their seven-day average of new reported case numbers after many lifted restrictions in recent weeks.

White House trade adviser Peter Navarro said Sunday that the Trump administration is preparing for a possible second wave, but he rejected the suggestion that a second wave has already taken hold.

“We are filling the stockpile in anticipation of a possible problem in the fall,” Navarro told Jake Tapper on CNN’s “State of the Union.” The United States had reported at least 2,270,000 cases and 118,000 deaths as of late Sunday.

Here are some significant developments:

  • House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and other Democrats condemned comments by President Trump at his Tulsa campaign rally, where he suggested that he had told officials to decrease testing efforts to suppress increasing case numbers.
  • China on Sunday halted imports from an Arkansas meatpacking plant where more than 220 employees tested positive for the coronavirus.
  • Spain reopened to most European tourists on Sunday, after weathering a brutal outbreak that killed more than 28,000 people.
  • Despite lower-than-expected attendance, a top health expert at Johns Hopkins University warned on Sunday that Trump’s rally in Tulsa could be a “superspreader” event, potentially spiking case numbers in Oklahoma, where rates already have been on the rise.

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1:34 a.m.

It may be the end of those uncomfortable nasal swabs as Britain trials coronavirus saliva test

A  health volunteer,  right, uses a swab to collect a sample from the nose of  70-year-old Richmond area resident Wayne Thorpe.
A health volunteer, right, uses a swab to collect a sample from the nose of 70-year-old Richmond area resident Wayne Thorpe. (John McDonnell/The Washington Post)

LONDON — New saliva-based coronavirus tests are being trialed in Britain this week, much to the relief of test subjects who have long described the traditional method of inserting a swab in the nose to be acutely unpleasant.

According to experts, the new saliva testing method is less invasive for participants as it involves spitting into a sample pot. Currently, swab testing is the typical approach with it placed deep into the back of the nose and throat. Some swab tests have also presented false negatives in the past.

Some 14,000 key workers and the people they live with will be participating in the project led by Southampton University, the local council and Britain’s National Health Service.

“Saliva testing could potentially make it easier for people to take coronavirus tests at home, without having to use swabs,” Britain’s Health Secretary, Matt Hancock, said as he thanked those participating in the national trial.

Hancock added that the saliva test had the power to “make a big difference, if it works well.”

Test pots will be sent to the homes of participants and collected by staff participating in the study. The pots can also be dropped off at an agreed location. The results will be available within 48 hours.

The trial is expected to run for at least four weeks, British media reported Monday.

With at least 42,717 deaths, Britain is the third hardest-hit country in the world, after the United States and Brazil. Prime Minister Boris Johnson has been widely criticized for his handling of the health crisis, with critics saying testing should have begun sooner.

By Jennifer Hassan
12:55 a.m.

Poaching on the rise as communities seek food and income during coronavirus lockdowns

In this July 2013 photo provided by the Wildlife Trust of India, forest guards check for snares during a patrol in the Manas National Park in northeastern India which is inhabited by tigers and elephants.
In this July 2013 photo provided by the Wildlife Trust of India, forest guards check for snares during a patrol in the Manas National Park in northeastern India which is inhabited by tigers and elephants. (AP)

At least four tigers and six leopards have been illegally killed by poachers in India since the country began its coronavirus lockdown, wildlife advocates told the Associated Press.

Officials in Asia and Africa fear poaching is on the rise amid the novel coronavirus pandemic. Other animals, including gazelles, wild boars and peacocks, have also been illegally hunted in recent months.

“It is risky to poach, but if pushed to the brink, some could think that these are risks worth taking,” Wildlife Trust of India biologist Mayukh Chatterjee said.

Tigers are endangered and leopards are threatened in some areas and endangered in others, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. People kill both big cat species for their coats.

The Wildlife Justice Commission issued a report in April suggesting that poachers had begun stockpiling illegally poached wares, like pangolin scales and rhinoceros horns, as they wait out the pandemic.

In Africa, officials believe commercial poaching has been kept in check because the park rangers who patrol to enforce hunting restrictions were designated as essential workers in most national parks. But some fear people have been increasingly hunting “bushmeat,” including duikers, antelopes and monkeys, for food in rural communities that have been hit hard by the economic impact of the pandemic.

“Rural people are struggling to feed themselves and their families,” Ray Jansen, chairman of the African Pangolin Working Group, told the Associated Press.

By Katie Shepherd
12:50 a.m.

Dubai set to reopen for tourism, allow residents to travel

A general view of Burj Khalifa in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, on June 5.
A general view of Burj Khalifa in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, on June 5. (Abdel Hadi Ramahi/Reuters)

DUBAI — Dubai authorities announced late Sunday that the country would once again be allowing in tourists — with a negative covid-19 test result — starting on July 7. Residents will also be allowed to travel again starting Monday.

The new travel rules for Dubai, a wealthy Persian Gulf emirate known for its soaring skyscrapers, luxury hotels and beaches, reflects the importance of tourism to the economy. Unlike United Arab Emirates capital Abu Dhabi, Dubai does not have oil and its economy relies significantly on international travel and tourism.

In 2019, more than 16 million tourists visited Dubai. The hotels, restaurants and other facilities catering to visitors have been desolate since a ban in late March on all arrivals except citizens. Even residency-visa holders — some 90 percent of the population — were not permitted to return to the country until just recently.

Unlike the other emirates in the UAE, Dubai implemented stricter lockdown policies, with a 24-hour curfew through much of April. It has now opened nearly everything up while Abu Dhabi is still sealed off from the rest of the country and Sharjah is only now opening beaches and museums — a move taken by Dubai weeks ago.

Under the new rules, arrivals must have a negative covid-19 test result or they will be tested at the airport and they will have to sign up for the DXB covid-19 app to facilitate communication if symptoms appear. Visitors must also have valid health insurance.

Residents and citizens returning to Dubai will be tested at the airport, register their details on the app and then stay at home until the test results come forward.

Dubai’s airport was once the busiest in the world for international travel. Its airline, Emirates, has laid off hundreds of staff.

By Paul Schemm
12:26 a.m.

A Cold War spy satellite and a rocket-powered plane: Aerospace giant Richard Passman had a career kids could only dream of

Richard “Dick” Passman had the brains of one of the smartest engineers of his time and lived a life and career that any kid could only dream of. He designed some of the country’s first fastest aircraft. He worked on the first spy satellite during the Cold War. He helped design generators that space crews left on the moon to help conduct science experiments.

Passman, 94, lived a long life and ran for exercise almost every day. But on April 1, the retired aeronautical engineer died at his home at a Sunrise assisted-living facility in Silver Spring, Md., from complications of the coronavirus, his family said.

“I would consider Dick as one of the most top-notch, first-rate aeronautical engineers, one of the best I’ve ever known,” said John Anderson, the curator for aerodynamics at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum.

Read more here.

By Ian Shapira
12:00 a.m.

Dutch police arrest hundreds after anti-lockdown protest turns violent

Police use a water cannon during a demonstration targeting the government’s handling of the coronavirus crisis, in Malieveld, the Hague, on Sunday.
Police use a water cannon during a demonstration targeting the government’s handling of the coronavirus crisis, in Malieveld, the Hague, on Sunday. (Michael Corder/AP)

Dutch police in The Hague arrested 400 people after an anti-lockdown protest turned violent and had to be dispersed with mounted officers and water cannon.

According to police, Sunday’s protest was initially peaceful but then turned violent with the arrival of soccer fans who began pelting officers with rocks and smoke bombs, prompting the move to disperse the crowd. Police added that the soccer fans were seeking to march into the center of the city, which had been forbidden.

Images from the protest show lines of police galloping on horseback toward the protest while a water cannon is fired over their heads.

“This has nothing to do with demonstrating or freedom of expression,” Hague Mayor Johan Remkes said in a statement. “This group deliberately aimed to disturb public order.”

The protest was organized by the group Virus Madness, which is against social distancing measures to stem the spread of the coronavirus. The protest was originally banned by the mayor over fears it could spur infections. A smaller event was then allowed to proceed, which ballooned in size. Reuters estimated that several thousand attended the rally.

The new cases of coronavirus peaked in April in the Netherlands with rates of over 1,000 a day but have since dropped to the double digits. There have been less than 50,000 total reported cases with just over 6,000 deaths.

By Paul Schemm
11:18 p.m.

New Zealand reports two new cases as travelers arrive from abroad

New Zealand's health department director-general Ashley Bloomfield speaks during a news conference about the covid-19 coronavirus at Parliament in Wellington on June 8, 2020.
New Zealand’s health department director-general Ashley Bloomfield speaks during a news conference about the covid-19 coronavirus at Parliament in Wellington on June 8, 2020. (Marty Melville/AFP/Getty Images)

New Zealand director general of health, Ashley Bloomfield, announced two new coronavirus cases Monday morning, bringing the total number of active infections nationwide to nine, after virtually eliminating the virus in May.

A teenage girl who had traveled with her family from Islamabad, with a stop in Melbourne, arrived in Auckland on June 13. She had a runny nose, but no other symptoms. Her family members tested negative for the virus. The other passengers on the flight from Melbourne have been placed in isolation until they test negative for the virus, Bloomfield said.

The second person to test positive was a man in his 30s arrived in New Zealand after traveling from India. One other person who arrived on the same Air India flight had also tested positive on Sunday, Bloomfield said.

New Zealand’s strict lockdown stamped out its coronavirus outbreak in just 49 days. But as the nation has reopened its borders to a small number of travelers, a few new cases have been recorded. The nation is using aggressive testing and mandated isolation of new arrivals to prevent the virus from spreading.

The two newest coronavirus patients tested positive while isolating after arriving in New Zealand. They have been moved to a hotel to quarantine until they clear the virus, Bloomfield said.

On June 16, New Zealand recorded the first two new cases after eliminating the virus within its borders, when two women traveling from Britain tested positive.

By Katie Shepherd
10:32 p.m.

New coronavirus cases rising as officials brace for ‘second wave’ this fall

President Trump speaks during a campaign rally Saturday in Tulsa. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)
President Trump speaks during a campaign rally Saturday in Tulsa. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

The Trump administration is stockpiling supplies in case of a second wave of infections this fall, as the novel coronavirus continues to spread in across the United States, a White House adviser said on Sunday.

“You prepare for what can possibly happen — I’m not saying it’s going to happen, but of course you prepare,” White House trade adviser Peter Navarro said on CNN.

Health experts, including Anthony S. Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, have said the United States is still enduring the first wave of its coronavirus outbreak. The number of coronavirus cases would have to decrease significantly for an extended period before the first wave can be considered over, Fauci said last week.

But many states have been seeing increases, rather than declines, in their seven-day average of reported new case numbers.

Twenty-nine states and U.S. territories reported a higher seven-day average on Sunday than they did on June 14. California, Missouri and Oklahoma reported record-high numbers of new cases, according to data tracked by The Washington Post. Many large states that lifted shutdown restrictions in recent weeks, including California, Texas and Florida, have also seen increases in daily case totals.

The increasing coronavirus numbers have led to contentious political spats in recent days. At his Tulsa campaign rally, President Trump said he had asked officials to “slow the testing down” to lower the numbers. White House officials later defended the remark as a joke, but Democrats condemned it.

By Katie Shepherd
10:03 p.m.

‘Heroes, right?’ A New York City paramedic and the injustices of covid-19

Paramedic Anthony Almojera, 43, outside the New York City Fire Department’s Seventh Avenue Station in Brooklyn. (Demetrius Freeman for The Washington Post)
Paramedic Anthony Almojera, 43, outside the New York City Fire Department’s Seventh Avenue Station in Brooklyn. (Demetrius Freeman for The Washington Post)

Nobody wants to know about what I do. People might pay us lip service and say we’re heroes, but our stories aren’t the kind anyone actually wants to hear about. Kids in this country grow up with toy firetrucks, or maybe playing cops and robbers, but who dreams of becoming a paramedic? That’s ambulances. That’s death and vulnerability — the scary stuff. We’re taught in this culture to shun illness like it’s something shameful. We’d rather pretend everything’s fine. We look the other way.

That’s what’s happening now in New York. We just had 20,000-some people die in this city, and already the crowds are lining back up outside restaurants and jamming into bars. This virus is still out there. We respond to 911 calls for covid every day. I’ve been on the scene at more than 200 of these deaths — trying to revive people, consoling their families — but you can’t even be bothered to stay six feet apart and wear a mask, because why? You’re a tough guy? It makes you look weak? You’d rather ignore the whole thing and pretend you’re invincible?

Read more here.

By Eli Saslow
9:38 p.m.

Eye care comes into focus during coronavirus

(iStock)
(iStock)

What is it about the eyes that have prompted the repeated coronavirus warnings?

Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has warned again and again. Wear a face mask, which may be effective because they remind you not to touch your face and eyes, among other things. Or use face shields, if you are a health-care worker.

“If someone sneezes in your face or if you touch a contaminated surface and then rub your eye,” says Jessica Belser, a microbiologist at the CDC, you risk getting the novel coronavirus in your eyes.

You want to protect your eyes from respiratory viruses for two main reasons. There is a direct connection between the eyes and the nasal passages, which can lead to respiratory infection. And viruses can infect the eyes themselves, which is called conjunctivitis — or pinkeye.

Read more here.

By Jill U. Adams
9:36 p.m.

Democrats, public health experts decry Trump for saying he asked officials to slow down coronavirus testing

President Trump speaks during a rally at the BOK Center on Saturday in Tulsa.
President Trump speaks during a rally at the BOK Center on Saturday in Tulsa. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

President Trump’s Saturday night remark that he asked officials to “slow the [coronavirus] testing down” sparked harsh rebukes from experts and frustration from his own staffers, who say it undercuts their efforts to reassure Americans as the disease surges around the country.

The president’s comment, which came on the same day that eight states reported their highest-ever single-day case counts, drew a chorus of criticism from congressional Democrats and public health officials, who worry the president is more concerned with saving face than combating the pandemic.

“Looking at it as a scoreboard is the wrong way to think about it,” said Amesh Adalja, an infectious-disease expert at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security. “To think of it as something you can manipulate or slow down based on what the numbers look like speaks to a complete misunderstanding of what an infectious-disease response should be.”

Read more here.

By Yasmeen Abutaleb, Taylor Telford and Josh Dawsey

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